Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan 4 as a Marker for Aggressive Squamous Cell Carcinoma

K Chen, J Yong, Roland Zauner (Co-author), Verena Wally (Co-author), J Whitelock, M Sajinovic, Z Kopecki, K Liang, KF Scott, AS Mellick

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is a cell surface proteoglycan that is currently under investigation as a marker of cancer malignancy, and as a potential target of anticancer drug treatment. CSPG4 acts as a driver of tumourigenesis by regulating turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to promote tumour cell invasion, migration as well as inflammation and angiogenesis. While CSPG4 has been widely studied in certain malignancies, such as melanoma, evidence is emerging from global gene expression studies, which suggests a role for CSPG4 in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). While relatively treatable, lack of widely agreed upon diagnostic markers for SCCs is problematic, especially for clinicians managing certain patients, including those who are aged or infirm, as well as those with underlying conditions such as epidermolysis bullosa (EB), for which a delayed diagnosis is likely lethal. In this review, we have discussed the structure of CSPG4, and quantitatively analysed CSPG4 expression in the tissues and pathologies where it has been identified to determine the usefulness of CSPG4 expression as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target in management of malignant SCC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5564
JournalCancers
Volume14
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Nov 2022

Keywords

  • JUNCTIONAL EPIDERMOLYSIS-BULLOSA
  • ANTIBODY-BASED IMMUNOTHERAPY
  • MELANOMA-ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN
  • PDGF ALPHA-RECEPTOR
  • NG2 PROTEOGLYCAN
  • PROGENITOR CELLS
  • MOLECULAR-CLONING
  • GROWTH-FACTOR
  • MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES
  • PROMOTER METHYLATION

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